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Crowcon

Crowcon incorporates SMART technology into its LaserMethane mini (LMm) remote gas detector

Detecting methane leaks for oil and gas distribution companies can be extremely difficult. Above ground pipelines can be out of reach and are often within restricted or gated locations.

Crowcon smartTo effectively carry out surveys, lifting equipment may be required – however, this is expensive and still leaves the operator in a potentially hazardous situation. Other issues such as seeking permission for access to closed buildings or areas make detecting methane more difficult and obtrusive.

The LaserMethane mini (LMm) from Crowcon addresses these issues because it detects methane from up to 30m away (or 100m with a reflector).

Its laser beam can penetrate transparent surfaces such as glass, meaning methane can be detected through the windows of closed premises, and confined spaces can be remotely and safely explored with no need for operator access.

Now with Bluetooth technology, the ATEX-approved LMm records real-time gas readings and GPS locations for storing. This allows important survey data, including gas level, time, date and location, to be combined, saved, or emailed to a central point.

Louise Early, portfolio development manager, Crowcon, says: "IoT technology usage is surprisingly uncommon within the gas detection industry and its inclusion on the LMm detector puts Crowcon's at the forefront of its development."

www.crowcon.com