News Headlines

  • Greater Manchester's trees contribute £33million a year to economy Nature
    Greater Manchester's trees contribute £33million a year to economy

    City of Trees has completed the biggest i-Tree Eco survey undertaken in the United Kingdom and it highlights the £33million annual value of Greater Manchester's trees to the economy and that 1million trees are at risk.

  • London supermarket's plastic free zones showcase 1,700 products Business
    London supermarket's plastic free zones showcase 1,700 products

    Attractive looking plastic free zones have been introduced by London supermarket Thornton's Budgens store in Camden's Belsize Park. In 10 weeks the store has managed to assemble more than 1,700 plastic-free products, featuring everything from fresh fruit and vegetables to wild game meat.

  • Leeds students donate to the homeless while they recycle food-on-the-go Resource & 'Waste'
    Leeds students donate to the homeless while they recycle food-on-the-go

    An initiative from recycling campaign #LeedsByExample means that students at Leeds Beckett University can now donate money to the homeless while they recycle their plastic bottles and cans or paper cups on campus - and targets millennials who eat most on the go than other age groups but recycle the least.

  • Concept of 'deep farms' underneath cities imagined Food
    Concept of 'deep farms' underneath cities imagined

    Academics have patented a new concept that would see food production taken underground. The revolutionary ideas are being promoted by University of Nottingham academics Professor Saffa Riffat, Fellow of the European Academy of Sciences and President of the World Society of Sustainable Technologies, and Professor Yijun Yuan, Marie Curie Research Fellow.

v ecohouse button

shared iterest button

web mossborough spud field copy

Synaptec Ltd

Synaptec's offshore turbine monitoring tech wins award for slashing costs

Glasgow-based Synaptec Ltd was the winner of the Best Offshore Renewables Innovation at the 2017 UK Energy Innovation Awards for its Refase™ product.

synaptec webBy their nature, offshore windfarms are hard to reach so when something goes wrong it costs £Millions to locate and repair the cause. At particular risk are the underwater cables which link offshore turbines together in 'strings' up to 12 long. If any part of these submerged cables fails (due to erosion, overheating, or an impact for example) the entire string can be taken out of service for days while engineers are sent out to sea to locate faults.

This is where Refase™ comes in; by using the fibre optic lines already embedded in all underwater cables, Refase™ can remotely monitor each turbine and each connecting cable without any power, locating faults in milliseconds rather than days. This reduces outage time, asset damage, repair times and even reputation cost, thanks to a unique combination of lower-cost monitoring technology, scalability and software:

Refase™ PCTs (Photonic Current Transducers) provide lower-cost monitoring for each intra-array cable by eliminating the power supply, copper, and telecommunication expense traditionally incurred at every sensor location.

Refase™ uses revolutionary photonic multiplexing to remote-monitor as many as 50 of these low-cost PCTs through only one standard, singlemode fibre - even if that fibre is already being used for telecommunications. This effectively creates up to 16 distinct protected sections per string at a lower cost than ever before.

Refase™ software instantly sends digital fault reports which refer to a specific intra-array cable. This enables controllers to focus on repairing faults, rather than finding them, resulting in greatly reduced outage costs and faster repair times.

http://synapt.ec