envirogy

Marketplace

  • Aquabio Movers & Shakers
    Aquabio

    Water treatment company raises funds for Sustrans cycling/walking charity

    A water re-use company has turned kilometres into pounds and donated funds to a charity which encourages people to walk and cycle.

  • ABB Air Quality
    ABB

    New ABB CEMS analyser offers all-in-one multiple measurement solution for combustion applications

    New multi-component analyser offers expanded all-in-one measurement capabilities for combustion gas stream monitoring

  • RWM 2017 Movers & Shakers
    RWM 2017

    Leading names share their sustainability solutions insights at RWM

    Speakers from M&S, WRAP, Adnams and The London Waste and Recycling Board will share their insights on future trends, policy and circular solutions. RWM brings together key industry stakeholders to discuss ways of unlocking sustainable wealth opportunities from the UK's resources. 

  • Eriez Waste Management
    Eriez

    All metals recovery with Eriez at RWM 2017

    Eriez will be showcasing their ECS module for complete ferrous and non-ferrous metals separation on stand 5P10-Q11 at the Recycling and Waste Management show taking place at the NEC, Birmingham from the 12th to 14th of September 2017.

v ecohouse button

web mossborough spud field copy

Thursday, 18 February 2016 15:40

'Smogmobile' discovers nitrogen dioxide higher inside cars than outside!

Pollution monitoring technology inside a 'Smogmobile' has shown that drivers may be exposed to more harmful nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution inside their vehicles than if they walked on the road outside!

smog in car1A mobile air quality laboratory was carried in an all-electric, no-emissions van on a journey from Reading to central London. The 'Smogmobile' sampled air inside and outside the vehicle every minute and found that levels of NO2 were on average 21% higher inside with the windows shut than on the road outside.

Dr Ben Barratt, Lecturer in Air Quality Science at King's College London, said: "This illustrative study adds to mounting evidence that vehicles provide little protection from harmful traffic pollution, and drivers and their passengers may even be exposed to higher levels than on the road outside.

"These initial findings highlight the urgent need for further investigation into the health risks faced by motorists and their passengers. It is especially important to understand the impacts of air pollution on professional motorists such as taxi and lorry drivers, who spend many hours behind the wheel each day."

Recent research has highlighted the damaging impact of NO2, which causes 23,500 deaths a year in the UK, and all but five of 43 regions in the UK breach EU safety limits.

Nearly 29,000 additional deaths a year are caused by particulates, fine particles which can lodge in the lungs. Diesel exhaust is the main cause of both pollutants which can aggravate heart and lung conditions and breathing problems.

smog in car2Duncan Mounsor, Managing Director of Enviro Technology Services, which developed the mobile lab, said: "Air pollution causes more than 50,000 deaths a year in the UK and costs the economy billions. We have developed the Air Quality Monitoring Vehicle to give local authorities and researchers a powerful new tool to plan action to clean up our air and tackle one of our greatest public health challenges."

The Air Quality Monitoring Vehicle is an all-electric van, so it can measure pollutants and greenhouse gases on the move without contributing any emissions itself.

It gathers air quality data in real time, both inside and outside the vehicle, plotting it against GPS coordinates.

It carries state-of-the-art instruments, several of which are more sensitive, more accurate and faster than the UK's national air quality monitoring network. These include equipment which can make highly accurate, direct measurements of NO2, in contrast to traditional instruments used by the UK's static air quality monitoring network, which measure NO2 indirectly and are unsuited to fast-changing environments.

Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at King's College London, who is also chairman of the government advisory body, the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, said: "Air pollution is the world's single largest environmental health risk. It shortens life expectancy, reduces lung function and worsens the symptoms of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease.

"Although London and the UK have extensive fixed site air quality monitoring sites the deployment of a mobile unit will provide instantaneous, onsite data directly relating to a multitude of air quality issues. A priority for the use of this mobile unit must be a more proactive approach to improving air quality by ensuring compliance with ambient air quality standards."

PILOT NITROGEN DIOXIDE STUDY

smog in car3The Air Quality Monitoring Vehicle conducted a pilot NO2 study on a two-hour journey from Reading along the M4 and through central London to Waterloo Bridge using its new capabilities. It found that the driver and passenger were consistently exposed to levels of NO2 the same as or higher than those on the road outside. Mean average concentrations of NO2 outside the vehicle were 66 µg m3 (micrograms per cubic metre) but 21% higher inside the vehicle at 80 µg m3.

The Air Quality Monitoring Vehicle also found levels of NO2 inside the vehicle reaching up to 350µg m3 for brief periods in central London. The EU sets an hourly safety limit of 200 µg m3 and an annual limit of 40 µg m3.

Dr Barratt said: "The Air Quality Monitoring Vehicle is a valuable tool for studying the health risks faced by drivers and their passengers and strategies for reducing risk, for example, by testing the effectiveness of different air filters. Up to now we've had to carry out research using instruments temporarily fixed to a vehicle. This is a permanent solution carrying robust, high-quality instrumentation, allowing studies to be revisited over time.

"The public health message is, you can't hide from air pollution inside a car. Many people think that if you cycle or walk you are exposed to more air pollution, but levels are significantly lower at the side of a road than in traffic.

"We advise the public to leave the car at home whenever possible. It exposes you and your family to lower levels of air pollution, you're not contributing to the problem, and you're also getting the benefits of exercise. That's tackling three of our biggest public health challenges in one go: air quality, climate change and obesity."

Many motorists have the option to walk, cycle or use public transport. On average primary school children live 1.8 miles from school, a 25-minute walk or 15-minute bike ride, yet 44% are driven to school. Nationally, 16.7 million people commute to work by car, including 67% in urban areas outside London and 30% in London.

LINKS
Enviro Technology Services
Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants
Dr Ben Barratt, Air Quality Science, King's College London