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  • Air Quality & Emissions Show (AQE) Air Quality
    Air Quality & Emissions Show (AQE)

    View live vehicle emissions data at AQE 2018

    Visitors to next week's Air Quality & Emissions Show (AQE 2018) in Telford will be able to view live emissions data from vehicles travelling on a road close to the Telford International Centre, where the event will take place (21-22nd Nov.) Ricardo plc, a global strategic engineering and environmental consultancy, will operate the monitoring equipment, providing a live feed into their AQE exhibition stand number No. 74.

  • ABB Laboratory, Monitoring, Process & Analytical
    ABB

    ABB to exhibit latest technologies for water and air monitoring at WWEM & AQE 2018 shows

    ABB's new AquaMaster flowmeter and Dynamic QR code remote assistance tool for air quality systems to feature at WWEM & AQE 2018 shows

  • Jacopa Water
    Jacopa

    Jacopa Strengthens Stormwater Solutions

    Wastewater solutions specialist Jacopa has reached a landmark agreement with German water technology systems expert Steinhardt GmbH as the sole agent for its wide range of flood and process protection products in the UK and Ireland.

  • EMEX 2018 Trade Shows & Conferences
    EMEX 2018

    EMEX, the Energy Management Exhibition, taking place on the 21st and 22nd of November at ExCeL London will have a stellar line-up of speakers and exhibitors.

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Wednesday, 15 June 2016 12:41

More flushed wet wipes threaten wildlife because of confusing labels

A 400 per cent rise in wet wipes on beaches is putting marine life at risk and pushing up water bills, claim the Marine Conservation Society, who are campaigning to banish confusing labelling.

beach wet wipes2The marine charity reveals how millions of wet wipes instead of ending up in the bin when they're finished with - are instead being popped down the toilet because of consumer confusion.

That's because some are labelled flushable, some biodegradable and some need you to read every bit of the small print which most of us can't be bothered to do. But the MCS point out that even those labelled flushable are failing to meet the water industry standard.

The MCS has launched a campaign to persuade retailers and manufacturers to clearly label their wet wipe products with a 'DON'T FLUSH' message on their packaging so they go in the bin, not down the loo.

"Our sewerage systems weren't built to cope with wet wipes. When flushed they don't disintegrate like toilet paper, and they typically contain plastic so once they reach the sea, they last for a very long time. They can cause blockages in our sewers, and then, everything else that has been flushed down the loo can either back up into people's homes, or overflow into rivers and seas," says MCS Head of Pollution, Dr Laura Foster.

It only takes a few flushed wet wipes to clog up your drains and when they team up with fats and oils they create massive fatbergs in the public sewers –which can be as big as a bus!

beach wet wipes1The MCS 'Wet Wipes Turn Nasty When You Flush Them' campaign highlights the monster issue that flushing unflushables is becoming and urges the public to get behind the charity's call for better wet wipe labelling.

The average cost to sorting out a wet wipe blockage is around £66. Water companies say there are over 366,000 sewer blockages throughout the UK every year, of which between 50% and 80% are caused by fats, oils and grease, wipes, sanitary waste and other unflushable items. Those figures have resulted in about £88 million being spent annually on sorting out the blockages - costs that will be paid for through higher customer bills.

In 2015, during the MCS Great British Beach Clean, volunteers found nearly 4,000 wet wipes around the UK coastline – that's roughly 50 for every kilometre cleaned – a 30% rise on the previous year and a 400% rise in a decade.

But wet wipes also pose a massive threat to marine life. Containing plastic, these squares never go away – they just get slowly broken down and become microplastics which are then ingested. Organisms negatively impacted by ingesting microplastic range from the small zooplankton to larger marine animals such as fin whales and they've been found in mussels heading for human consumption.

"This source of microplastic is easy to prevent and we want any product which is being designed to be washed or flushed down the drain to be free from plastics," says Dr Foster. "Retailers have already recognised the issue of microplastics in face scrubs- designing a product that is guaranteed to pollute the environment isn't smart. We want to see them changing the labeling so consumers get rid of wipes in the right way and help stop tiny bits of plastic getting into our seas."

LINK
MCS 'Wet Wipes Turn Nasty When You Flush Them' campaign