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    See the stories from those tackling the air quality health and environmental problem.

     

    Either click on the following link or front cover image to access the publication  https://flickread.com/edition/html/5e787d30aafab#1

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    The built environment industry can influence the resilience, sustainability and quality of homes, buildings and elements of infrastructure and cities. Registration has opened for Futurebuild 2020 with a call to industry to act now if we are to successfully tackle the challenges facing us all. By joining the event from 03 to 05 March at ExCeL London, visitors will be able to unite with industry innovators to tackle climate change and become the catalyst for change that's so greatly needed.

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Monday, 11 December 2017 10:52

Confused about recycling? Then throw in general waste say Association

High rates of contamination in recycled materials have prompted the Recycling Association to advise 'if in doubt throw it out when recycling at home', because the public are often unsure whether household items are recyclable or not.

recycling assn conveyorThe Association point out that packaging is becoming increasingly complex, and that local authorities can have completely different collection schemes compared to neighbouring ones adding to the confusion.

But The Recycling Association, who represent more than 80 organisations, is saying that you should always recycle clean, single material plastics, paper, metal cans and glass in your recycling bin.

recycling assn logo ofIf an item of packaging is made of multiple materials and you aren't sure whether it can be recycled or not, it is better to put it into your general waste bin than your recycling bin.

This is because almost one fifth of the material collected for recycling from households is material that cannot currently be recycled.

The Recycling Association chief executive Simon Ellin said: "We have thought for a while that the public are increasingly confused when looking at packaging items whether they can be recycled or not.

"Some people may think they should put it in the recycling just in case it can be recycled and do the right thing. But often, this can lead to more contamination of the materials that can genuinely be recycled.

recycling assn cans"So our advice to people is If in doubt, throw it out as that is better than putting the wrong items in the recycling bin."

This has been backed up by a survey undertaken by The Recycling Association that found that the public know you can recycle the simplest household items, but get confused when the products are more complex.

Members of the public were questioned by The Recycling Association over whether they would recycle common household packaging in their recycling bin at home or not, or whether they were unsure. The results were:

• 100% of respondents said they would recycle a baked bean can after the beans had been eaten

• A total of 42% said they recycled a black meat tray with a clear plastic film covering, 44% did not, while 14% were unsure

• People were more confident about recycling a spray detergent bottle, with 89% saying they put it in their recycling at home, only 9% did not, and just 3% were unsure

• When it came to a paper envelope with a plastic window for the address, 75% of people would put these in the recycling bin, 21% would not and 4% were unsure.

recycling assn general logoSimon Ellin added: "For a while now, The Recycling Association has been campaigning for more responsibility throughout the supply chain to make recycling easier for the public to do. All too often, the packaging designers, manufacturers and retailers leave it to local authorities and the recycling sector to sort this out. But unless the public are given packaging items that are easy to understand, inevitably items that shouldn't be included for recycling end up in the recycling bin.

"Our survey backs up our view that many common household items are confusing the public when it comes to knowing whether they can be recycled or not. People generally get that you can recycle a can, a plastic bottle or a cardboard box. The one thing that unites all of these is that they tend to be simple products made from one material.

"But when it comes to more complex multi-material packaging and products, people become less sure. This means that some people will put items in their recycling bin that may not be recyclable, and contaminate recyclable products.

"We would also like to see more consistency in local authority collections too. For example, some local authorities collect black plastic meat trays and some don't, even though this is currently a challenging material to recycle."

www.therecyclingassociation.com