Marketplace

  • Bradshaw battery operated tow tractor Transport
    Bradshaw battery operated tow tractor

    Bradshaw releases third generation T800 8-tonne battery operated tow tractor

    The four-wheel, 8-tonne tow tractor on the market, the T800 has been a popular model for more than 25 years. It is used for baggage towing in airports, line feed in manufacturing, waste movement, bin towing, and many other applications.

  • Panasonic - heating & cooling solutions Air Quality
    Panasonic - heating & cooling solutions

    Science & Technology Key for Better Indoor Air Quality

    To keep our minds sharp and our bodies healthy, we need to breathe in approximately 18kg of air a day. This is a lot of air, especially when you consider that we eat just 1.3kg of food and drink 1.4kg of water per day. A large proportion of this air is consumed within buildings that we live, work and sleep in, in fact, a report from the European Commission indicates that Europeans now spend up to 90% of their time inside.

  • Lord Redesdale answers frequent questions about EMEX Energy & Resource Management
    Lord Redesdale answers frequent questions about EMEX

    Lord Redesdale, EMEX Conference Chair, says: "We have so much to discuss and achieve to drive forward energy efficiency and Net Zero," and has put together answers to the main questions raised about the well established EMEX exhibition and conference, which for 2021 takes place next Wednesday 24 and Thursday 25 at ExCeL in London's docklands. 

  • Holding Mayor to account on floods - London Assembly Member & Councillor to speak at Floodex Water
    Holding Mayor to account on floods - London Assembly Member & Councillor to speak at Floodex

    Hina Bokhari, London Assembly Member & Merton Councillor to speak at Floodex 2021

    Newly elected London Assembly member Hina Bokhari will be joining Floodex to talk about her work holding the Mayor of London to account on flooding. In her work at City Hall, she's Deputy Chair of the Economy Committee, and sits as a member of the Environment Committee and the Fire, Resilience and Emergency Planning Committee.

v ecohouse button

web mossborough spud field copy

Thursday, 24 March 2022 11:26

Sewage bugs convert Tata Steel's Port Talbot gas emissions into industry raw materials

Super bugs in sewage are helping to convert steelmaking emissions into sustainable raw materials for other industries, a new project led by the University of South Wales has discovered.

The billions of microscopic bacteria at Tata Steel's blast furnaces are converting its emissions into products ranging from food packaging to animal feed.

A pilot project has been set up at the two huge Port Talbot iron making furnaces. While still in its infancy the project has already shown promising results.

TataSteel-PortTalbot-BlastFurnace4Dr Rhiannon Chalmers-Brown from the University of South Wales, said: "As the world is coming to terms with the challenges of net-zero CO2 steelmaking, there are lots of options to consider. Not only in terms of different steelmaking technologies, but also around any opportunities to capture and use the carbon-based process gases.

"The process we are testing here bubbles off-gases from the blast furnaces through sewage sludge, which contains a certain type of bacteria which is able to consume both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide."

And she added: "We're currently getting quite high levels of carbon utilisation which we think we can increase up to about 98%.

"The waste products from those bacteria include acetic acid and volatile fatty acids which can be used for a huge range of commercially viable end-uses such as paints, bioplastic-polymers or even animal feeds."

The project is just the latest collaboration between Tata Steel and the university exploring how waste gasses from the steelmaking processes at Port Talbot can be harnessed and used to support other industries while reducing the amount of CO2 released.

Dr Chalmers-Brown added: "While this pilot is looking at gases from blast furnaces, pretty much every iron and steelmaking technology emits some carbon-based gases, so this technology has potential to reduce those emissions whichever technology route is eventually chosen.

"There's still quite a lot of work to do with the pilot reactor, collecting data and to understand what we can about the biological reactions."

Gareth Lloyd, Process Engineering Manager from Tata Steel and industry sponsor, added: "This is a great project, which could be a real game-changer and is yet another example of the benefits of working closely with some of our top universities."

Tata Steel in the UK has the ambition to produce net-zero steel by 2050 at the latest and to have reduced 30% of CO2 emissions by 2030. The vast majority of that work will happen in South Wales where the company's largest operational site is. Tata Steel is developing detailed plans for this transition to future steelmaking based on low CO2 technologies.