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Wednesday, 24 June 2015 10:11

Tall stack will help Milton Keynes reduce bin bags to tip by 95%

Construction work on Milton Keynes Waste Recovery Park has reached another milestone – with a 55metre high steel stack now in place following a week-long installation programme. It is the tallest section of the facility.

milton keynes energy park2The stack has been installed in three parts, with the sections weighing 14 tonnes, 16.5tonnes and 17tonnes each and with a diameter of 2.3metres. The sections were constructed by a specialist manufacturer in Denmark prior to being transported to Milton Keynes and craned into place.

The Waste Recovery Park is located on Dickens Road in Old Wolverton and will bring together three technologies – Mechanical Treatment, Anaerobic Digestion and Advanced Thermal Treatment - to treat 'black sack' waste collected from homes in Milton Keynes. Together, the technologies will increase the amount of recyclable materials which are removed from the waste, in turn cutting the amount of rubbish sent to landfill by 95%.

Paul Greenwell, Waste Treatment Managing Director of Amey - which is constructing and will operate the new waste facility on behalf of Milton Keynes Council - said: "This is a significant milestone in our construction programme and the facility is now really beginning to take shape.

"Major pieces of equipment have already been installed and we're well on track to finishing construction as planned in January 2016. The stack is a key element of our Advanced Thermal Treatment plant. This turns waste into a gas, which in turn is combusted to generate high temperature steam which creates renewable electricity in a turbine."

Cllr Mick Legg, Cabinet Member for Environment and Waste added: "I am very impressed with the good progress being made at the MK Waste Recovery Park and that we're on schedule to see it open at the end of the summer 2016 when it will begin to make a real difference to the way we process waste here in Milton Keynes."

Other key sections of the Advanced Thermal Treatment plant, including the boilers and furnaces, are already in place. Some of the equipment weighed up to 80 tonnes and measured up to 4.7m wide, meaning delivery and installation required careful planning and coordination, including specialist crane lifting operations.

Elsewhere on site, work continues on cladding the buildings which will house the treatment technologies and a visitor centre. Mechanical treatment technology will be installed in the autumn. Around 70 building specialists are working on site each day.

VolkerFitzpatrick is Amey's construction partner for Milton Keynes Waste Recovery Park and is carrying out the civil engineering and building works.

Following construction completion in January 2016, the facility will go through commissioning and testing periods before it is fully operational in September 2016.

LINKS
Milton Keynes Waste Recovery Park
Amey plc
VolkerFitzpatrick