Marketplace

  • GlasPort Bio Ltd - overall Rushlight Award winners, reduce gas & add value to manure Awards & Standards
    GlasPort Bio Ltd - overall Rushlight Award winners, reduce gas & add value to manure

    Animal manure has long been recognised as a valuable fertiliser and a source of renewable energy. It is also a major source of pollution, with emissions from stored manure accounting for approximately 15% of all agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and more than 70% of all ammonia emissions in Europe.

  • Ion Science - new protection against VOCs Health & safety
    Ion Science - new protection against VOCs

    Offering a new level of enhanced, reliable protection against VOCs with the first 11.7 Cub personal solution from ION Science.

    In a 2018 report from the UN, it was revealed that a worker dies every 30 seconds due to exposure to toxic gases in the workplace. That such statistics still exist today is one of the reasons ION Science is working hard to create protective technologies for workers against VOC exposure. The new 11.7 eV Cub personal solution is the first of its kind and promises to be a game-changer for protection against exposure.

    ion science VOC sensorThe Cub 11.7 eV personal device is the latest addition to ION Science's world-leadingrange of gas and leak detection products. Using their 30 years of industry experienceand their extensive knowledge of both volatile organic compounds (VOCs) andphotoionisation detection (PID), ION Science continue to deliver excellence in protection for workers.

    The 11.7 eV sensor lamp is a notoriously difficult lamp to manufacture. Due to its highly sensitive nature, 11.7 eV devices in the past have been temperamental, require frequent lamp changes and ultimately end up with increased environmental exposure, affecting performance of the device.

    ION Science has tackled this issue and developed a refined manufacturing method that eliminates some of the sensitivities and issues previously associated with 11.7 eV detection.

    As the first 11.7 personal detection solution from ION Science, the Cub 11.7 offers all the features a customer would expect from the market leader.

    This includes resistance to humidity and moisture, operational in temperatures from 0-55 degrees, and intrinsically safe even in explosive environments. Its lightweight design at only 111g makes it comfortable for wearers and the small size doesn't impede movement or work.

    Unrivalled Gas Detection.
    ionscience.com

  • CORE (UK) Ltd - Supply chain pioneers win Queens Award Awards & Standards
    CORE (UK) Ltd - Supply chain pioneers win Queens Award

    Supply chain pioneers, CORE (UK) Ltd, win The Queen's Award for Enterprise for International Trade

    CORE (UK) Ltd, leaders in digital supply chain management software have been awarded the prestigious Queen's Award for Enterprise for International Trade for outstanding growth and commercial success in international trade.

  • Enviva - Sustainable Benefits of the Wood Pellet Industry Energy & Resource Management
    Enviva - Sustainable Benefits of the Wood Pellet Industry

    Sustainable Benefits of the Wood Pellet Industry - by Dr. Jennifer Jenkins, Chief Sustainability Officer at Enviva

    Healthy, growing forests remain one of the most critical tools in the fight to mitigate climate change, and sustainable forest management is part of every plan outlined by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (the "IPCC") to limit global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

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Wednesday, 02 October 2019 12:55

Homeless charity shop fed up being treated like costly landfill dump

National homelessness charity, Emmaus, is highlighting how charity shops are often used as an alternative to landfill, reporting that one of its communities spent up to £47,000 on taking items to the tip that had been donated but were not fit to be resold.

Emmaus highlighted the issue during Recycle Now's recent Recycle Week campaign, which celebrates recycling, and educates members of the public on the importance of reusing, reducing and recycling, as well as asking them to think twice when donating an item to a charity shop.

emmaus 1

Emmaus supports formerly homeless people by giving them a home, work experience in its social enterprises, funded training and an opportunity to get themselves back on their feet again. There are 29 Emmaus communities across the UK which, unlike most other homelessness services, provide a home for as long as someone needs it. There are also five groups working toward opening accommodation in the future. For many, this support and stability is like the family they don't have, providing a safe environment in which to settle and rebuild their lives. Often this is an opportunity to overcome issues such as addiction, get support with mental health issues or rebuild relationships with estranged family.

Social enterprise is central to the Emmaus model as it provides meaningful work for formerly homeless people while generating vital funds for Emmaus communities. With 85 charity shops and 10 superstores across the UK, Emmaus prevented 12,924 tonnes of items going to landfill between July 2018 and June 2019. There is, however, a darker side to charity donations, with Emmaus communities reporting that 810 tonnes of donated goods were sent to landfill during this time because they were not fit to be sold on.

Simon Grainge, CEO of Emmaus UK said, "It is important for us to support national campaigns such as Recycle Week so that we can encourage our supporters to become actively involved in recycling. The environmental issues we are facing on a national and global scale are frightening, and in the wake of increased awareness we now need to start recycling smarter, not harder.

emmaus 2"Our communities and shops are grateful for the items that are kindly donated. Without these donations, we would be unable to sustain the communities and continue to offer a home for as long as it is needed to formerly homeless people, however, do think twice about whether the item you are donating can be resold or reused. If it can't, and you donate it anyway, it means a cost to our communities and a trip to the tip, pulling away essential funds that could have gone to building more rooms to offer a home to more homeless people. Last year, an Emmaus community spent £47,000 getting rid of items that could not be resold or reused. This amount is unsustainable, and it is therefore important to remember that charity shops are not an alternative to a landfill."

Emmaus is asking the nation to think twice before donating items to charity shops. Ask yourself the following:
• Is my donation clean and functional?
• Can it be sold on?
• Would you buy the item in the condition that it is in?

If you are unsure whether a shop will take donation, call them beforehand and ask.

For further information about Emmaus, or if you would like to find out more about donating, visit www.emmaus.org.uk